Flag

An official website of the United States government

U.S. Consulate General Nogales

History

Nogales is located 60 miles south of Tucson, Arizona and 140 miles north of Hermosillo, Sonora on the Arizona-Sonora Border. The city of Nogales was officially founded in 1882 along a north-south rail line to promote trade between the United States and Mexico. The name “Nogales” refers to a now extinct stand of black walnut trees found in nearby hills, most of which are still covered with a native oak.

A U.S. Consular Agency in Nogales was established in 1884. It was closed for budgetary reasons in 1970 but reopened in 1998. It was upgraded to a consulate in 1889 with the arrival of Consul Delos H. Smith. Our mission was upgraded to Consulate General in 2012.

A new Consulate General complex was officially announced in 2019. The new Consulate General is located on a hilltop site with stunning mountain views. The new complex will provide a sustainable, resilient, safe and secure platform for U.S. diplomacy in Nogales and completion is anticipated in 2022.

Long a vital entry point into the US from western and northern Mexico, Nogales has grown in the past 40 years from a pleasant small town to a booming factory town, its growth fueled by maquiladora factories which assemble primarily US made parts into goods exported around the world. There are over 100 factories in Nogales, and another 50-100 in other border communities along the Arizona/Sonora border. These factories have caused tremendous growth with many residents of central and southern Mexico moving north to seek employment. These factories account for 39,000 jobs in Nogales, and another 35,000 elsewhere in the consular district. The fresh produce industry has also grown tremendously with 60% of all winter produce consumed in the US and Canada passing through Nogales, Sonora and processed in Nogales, Arizona. Most of the produce comes from areas in Sonora and Sinaloa. Cattle ranching, mining and small farms still comprise an important part of the economy of the region. Nogales is also a major border crossing for Americans going south for the winter into Mexico and to the Pacific beaches year-round.

Sonora has traditionally been a relatively prosperous state with a well-developed middle class. The capital of Sonora, Hermosillo, is a bustling and growing commercial and industrial center of almost a million people. Official estimates put the population of Nogales at 212,000 but it continues to grow. Agua Prieta and San Luis Rio Colorado, two other important border cities in this consular district are also large and growing. Puerto Peñasco, a shrimp fishing port and vacation destination for Arizonans located at the top of the Gulf of California, has become a major resort and residence for Americans.

Consular District

Consular District Map
Consular District Map
Sonora’s Northern state cities served by the U.S. Consulate General in Nogales
Agua PrietaEsquedaPitiquito
AltarFronterasPuerto Peñasco
ArizpeImurisSan Ignacio
AtilMagdalenaSan Luis Río Colorado
BacoachiNacoSanta Ana
CaborcaNacozariSáric
CananeaNogalesSonoyta
CocosperaOquitoaTubutama
CucurpeP. E. Calles

Emergency Services

In this section, you will find information regarding emergency situations and what resources are available to you as an American Citizen in Mexico. Please use the navigation to the left to find more information regarding various emergency situations.

Victims of Crime:

This section provides a general description of the criminal justice system in Mexico. Some items of information below may not be relevant or precise with regard to a particular case.  Questions involving interpretation of Mexican law should be addressed to a lawyer licensed to practice in Mexico.

List of Medical Providers and Hospitals in the Nogales Consular District:

The following list is arranged in alphabetical order by surname. It does not list all the well-qualified physicians in the district but provides a representative selection.

The Consulate General in Nogales assumes no responsibility for either the quality of these medical providers or for their fees.

Please download form (PDF 263 KB) to access our list of medical providers and hospitals.

Legal Assistance:

The U.S. Consulate General in Nogales cannot represent U.S. Citizens in court nor provide legal counsel.  Instead, you may wish to consult with an attorney in Mexico, who can provide advice on your options and remedies within the Mexican legal system.  The U.S. Consulate General in Nogales has a list of attorneys corresponding to our consular district; however, it cannot recommend a particular attorney and assumes no responsibility for the quality of service provided.

Please download the list (PDF 367Kb) of attorneys.

Death of a U.S. Citizen:

When a U.S. Citizen dies abroad, the Consulate General can notify the family in the U.S. and provide information about the options and costs of disposition of the remains.  The family must pay all costs.

The Consulate General also prepares a Report of Death based on the local death certificate. This Report can be used as proof of death in most legal proceedings in the United States.

More information is available on the internet at:
http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/abroad/events-and-records/death.html

Arrest of a U.S. Citizen:

If you are aware that a U.S. Citizen is under arrest in Mexico, please ask the authorities to notify the Consulate General immediately. The Consulate General can work to help protect the person and ensure fair treatment. The Consulate General will also visit the prisoner; provide information about the local legal process, as well as a list of local attorneys; and notify family.

More information is available on the internet at:
https://travel.state.gov/content/congress-liaison-home/en/Congressional_Liaison/Americans-Abroad/EmergenciesAbroad/arrests.html

Child Abduction:

The Government of the United States has designated the Office of Children’s Issues of the Department of State as its central authority for child abduction cases.

General information on the Office of Children’s Issues and international child abduction is available on the internet at:

International Child Abduction
https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction.html

Mexico-specific details on International Child Abduction
https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction/International-Parental-Child-Abduction-Country-Information/Mexico.html

Missing Persons-Locating a U.S. Citizen:

If you need to reach a U.S. Citizen in Mexico due to an emergency or because you are worried about his/her health or welfare, please contact the Consulate General in Nogales directly at: (844) 528-6611, during work hours (if calling from the U.S., please dial 011 52 before the phone number).

After work hours, please contact the Duty Officer at the cell phone: (301) 985-8843 (if calling from the U.S., please dial 011 52-1 before the phone number).

You may also contact the State Department’s Office of Overseas Citizen Services at (202) 647-5225

More information is available on the internet at:
http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/emergencies.html