University Presidents’ Summit Tijuana-San Diego

The University Presidents’ Summit, held today at the U.S. Consulate General in Tijuana, brought together the presidents and rectors of the principal universities from both sides of the border in order to launch the CaliBaja Consortium for Higher Education.

Today’s meeting is part of our efforts under both the 100,000 Strong in the America’s initiative and the Bilateral Forum on Higher Education, Innovation and Research, called FOBESII from its initials in Spanish. In January of this year, Presidents Obama and Peña Nieto made clear that FOBESII is an integral part of our High Level Economic Dialogue, and a key to the economic success of both nations.

Hosted by the U.S. Consul General in Tijuana, Andrew S. E. Erickson, and the Mexican Consul General in San Diego, Remedios Gomez Arnau, the Summit’s goal is to make the California/Baja California region a leader in cross-border education by the year 2020. The discussion at the Summit focused on key areas: language acquisition; learning for regional competitiveness; women and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM); and funding.

The consortium as envisioned is a nonbinding agreement amongst higher-education institutions to work together to implement programs in the near term and to develop additional programs – and capacity – in the long term, in order to increase regional competitiveness and decrease the barriers to cross-border education, to make CaliBaja Consortium the leader in education across the U.S.-Mexico border by 2020.

Senior leaders from fourteen U.S. and Mexican institutions of higher education attended the event, which included a distinguished panel of presidents and rectors: Dr. Fernando Leon of CETYS Universidad; Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla of UC San Diego; Dr. Juan Manuel Ocegueda from the State University of Baja California (UABC); Dr. Melinda Nish from Southwestern College; and Dr. Michael Cunningham from National University in San Diego.

Participants also included Dr. Martha Navarro-Albo, the Deputy Director General of Academic Cooperation and the General Coordinator of Proyecta 100,000 at the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Margaret Hug, the Coordinator for 100,000 Strong in the Americas at the U.S. Department of State,

Participating universities have made the following commitments:

CETYS University is offering its students undergraduate or graduate courses, as well as certificates and double degrees in the United States. It offers Imperial Valley College students the possibility of completing their degree in Engineering at CETYS.

UC San Diego is committed to helping Mexican students who are trying to enhance their academic record on their path to admission into a research university such as UC San Diego, as well as leveraging existing programs to include Mexican nationals.  These programs include providing opportunities for at least 10 Mexican high school students to participate in residential summer programs at UC San Diego, offering online learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), and developing relationships with high schools in Tijuana interested in offering UC San Diego credit courses and AP courses taught by graduate students on site.

UABC is working to strengthen student exchange and academic mobility through programs designed to encourage students to study other languages and participate in summer and semester programs in the United States, particularly at universities in California, as well as at universities in Europe.

“Southwestern College has taken a significant step in helping students earn degrees and certificates on both sides of the border,” said Dr. Melinda Nish, college superintendent/president. “Our Governing Board has unanimously approved MOUs with CETYS and UTT (Tijuana universities) that serve as a foundation for development of transborder education work plans among our three institutions.”

National University commits to supporting cross-border education initiatives by investing $2 million in scholarships by 2020 for Mexican student cohorts enrolled in the University’s ESL, undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition, the University commits to hiring a full-time internship coordinator to facilitate cross-border placements for students, and will also provide transfer pathways for Mexican students studying at community colleges. National University will furthermore continue offering ESL and other study opportunities through Mexico’s Proyecta 100,000 program.

High resolution photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/consuladousatijuana/sets/72157650856038926/

DoS Article

The University Presidents’ Summit, held today at the U.S. U.S. Consulate General in Tijuana, brought together the presidents and rectors of the principal universities from both sides of the border in order to launch the CaliBaja Consortium for Higher Education.

Today’s meeting is part of our efforts under both the 100,000 Strong in the America’s initiative and the Bilateral Forum on Higher Education, Innovation and Research, called FOBESII from its initials in Spanish. In January of this year, Presidents Obama and Peña Nieto made clear that FOBESII is an integral part of our High Level Economic Dialogue, and a key to the economic success of both nations.

Hosted by the U.S. Consul General in Tijuana, Andrew S. E. Erickson, and the Mexican Consul General in San Diego, Remedios Gomez Arnau, the Summit’s goal is to make the California/Baja California region a leader in cross-border education by the year 2020. The discussion at the Summit focused on key areas: language acquisition; learning for regional competitiveness; women and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM); and funding.

The consortium as envisioned is a nonbinding agreement amongst higher-education institutions to work together to implement programs in the near term and to develop additional programs – and capacity – in the long term, in order to increase regional competitiveness and decrease the barriers to cross-border education, to make CaliBaja Consortium the leader in education across the U.S.-Mexico border by 2020.

Senior leaders from fourteen U.S. and Mexican institutions of higher education attended the event, which included a distinguished panel of presidents and rectors: Dr. Fernando Leon of CETYS Universidad; Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla of UC San Diego; Dr. Juan Manuel Ocegueda from the State University of Baja California (UABC); Dr. Melinda Nish from Southwestern College; and Dr. Michael Cunningham from National University in San Diego.

Participants also included Dr. Martha Navarro-Albo, the Deputy Director General of Academic Cooperation and the General Coordinator of Proyecta 100,000 at the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Margaret Hug, the Coordinator for 100,000 Strong in the Americas at the U.S. Department of State,

Participating universities have made the following commitments:

CETYS University is offering its students undergraduate or graduate courses, as well as certificates and double degrees in the United States. It offers Imperial Valley College students the possibility of completing their degree in Engineering at CETYS.

UC San Diego is committed to helping Mexican students who are trying to enhance their academic record on their path to admission into a research university such as UC San Diego, as well as leveraging existing programs to include Mexican nationals.  These programs include providing opportunities for at least 10 Mexican high school students to participate in residential summer programs at UC San Diego, offering online learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), and developing relationships with high schools in Tijuana interested in offering UC San Diego credit courses and AP courses taught by graduate students on site.

UABC is working to strengthen student exchange and academic mobility through programs designed to encourage students to study other languages and participate in summer and semester programs in the United States, particularly at universities in California, as well as at universities in Europe.

“Southwestern College has taken a significant step in helping students earn degrees and certificates on both sides of the border,” said Dr. Melinda Nish, college superintendent/president. “Our Governing Board has unanimously approved MOUs with CETYS and UTT (Tijuana universities) that serve as a foundation for development of transborder education work plans among our three institutions.”

National University commits to supporting cross-border education initiatives by investing $2 million in scholarships by 2020 for Mexican student cohorts enrolled in the University’s ESL, undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition, the University commits to hiring a full-time internship coordinator to facilitate cross-border placements for students, and will also provide transfer pathways for Mexican students studying at community colleges. National University will furthermore continue offering ESL and other study opportunities through Mexico’s Proyecta 100,000 program.

High resolution photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/consuladousatijuana/sets/72157650856038926/